exhibitions Tag

Well Now WTF? Online Exhibition

Museums are closed. School is cancelled. The world is shut off and we’re stuck indoors. All the bread has been sold and Twitter has lost its mind. Fox News is killing off its own demographic. While everything is cancelled, why not have a show?

In spite of everything, Silicon Valet is pleased to present Well Now WTF?, an online exhibition curated by Faith Holland, Lorna Mills, and Wade Wallerstein featuring 80 artists with moving image practices opening April 4, 2020 from 8 to 10 pm EST.

URL for the exhibition: https://wellnowwtf.siliconvalet.org

With everything going on, we ask ourselves: Well Now WTF? We have no answer, but we do know how to make GIFs. We can come together and use the creative tools at our disposal to build a space for release outside of anxiety-inducing news cycles and banal social media feeds. As co-curator Lorna Mills suggests, “Why masturbate alone, when we can all be wankers together?”

Well Now WTF? is available online at wellnowwtf.siliconvalet.org. The exhibition will be free and open to the public, with a $5 suggested, pay-what-you-wish entry that gets redistributed to the artists contributing work.

The exhibition will be accompanied by essays by Wade Wallerstein and Seth Watter.

Participating artists: A Bill Miller, Ad Minoliti, Adrienne Crossman, Alex McLeod, Alice Bucknell, Alma Alloro, Andres Manniste, Anneli Goeller, Anthony Antonellis, Antonio Roberts, Ben Sang, Benjamin Gaulon, Carla Gannis, Carlos Sáez, Casey Kauffmann, Casey Reas, Cassie McQuater, Chiara Passa, Chris Collins, Cibelle Cavalli Bastos, Claudia Bitran, Claudia Hart, Clusterduck Collective, Daniel Temkin, Devin Kenny, Don Hanson, Dominic Quagliozzi, Elektra KB, Ellen.Gif, Eltons Kuns, Emilie Gervais, Erica Lapadat-Janzen, Erica Magrey, Erin Gee, Eva Papamargariti, Faith Holland, Geoffrey Pugen, Guido Segni, Hyo Myoung Kim, Ian Bruner, Jan Robert Leegte, Jenson Leonard, Jeremy Bailey, Jillian McDonald, Kamilia Kard, Laura Gillmore, Laura Hyunjhee Kim, Lauryn Siegel, Libbi Ponce, Lilly Handley, Lorna Mills, LoVid, Mara Oscar Cassiani, Mark Dorf, Mark Klink, Maurice Andresen, Maya Ben David, Molly Erin McCarthy, Molly Soda, Nicolas Sassoon, Nicole Killian, Olia Svetlanova, Olivia Ross, Pastiche Lumumba, Peter Burr, Petra Cortright, Rafia Santana, Rea Mcnamara, Rick Silva, Rita Jiménez, Ryan Kuo, Ryan Trecartin, Santa France, Sara Ludy, Sebastian Schmieg, Shawné Michaelain Holloway, Stacie Ant, Sydney Shavers, Terrell Davis, Theo Triantafyllidis, Tiare Ribeaux, Travess Smalley, Wednesday Kim, Will Pappenheimer, Yidi Tsao, Yoshi Sodeoka, and more to be announced

Media: Well Now WTF? has been discussed in The Japan Times, Canadian Art, CBC, and Art Forum

Artist Project Toronto

👾Project H.E.A.R.T. (Holographic Empathy Attack Robotics Team)👾 (2017) made by Erin Gee in collaboration with Alex M Lee is featured as part of the Telegenic booth at Artist Project Toronto. Our booth is just left of the entrance (can’t miss it) and is part of a sponsored exhibition with six other exciting new media artists.

Much thanks to EQ Bank, Telegenic, Radiance VR, and House of VR for sponsoring and organizing the exhibit. ☠️

 

Review: Akimblog, Canada

The first review for my solo exhibition To the Sooe at the MacKenzie Art Gallery is here!  To the Sooe is on view until April 19th in Regina, Canada.

“Gee delivers the output in ASMR style through role play and a sound performance that leave you both mesmerized and tingling to your core. The sterile white walls and scientific jargon of the exhibition texts should not deter you from this immersive and sensory experience. Gee’s complex communication configurations require your time, patience and an open mind.” -Alexa Heenan, Akimblog

Click here to read the full review

Cover Story: Leader Post

I was surprised for my exhibition To the Sooe to be featured as front-page news on January 27, 2020 in the Leader Post, the leading newspaper of Regina Saskatchewan. Inside the paper you can find an interview with exhibition curator Tak Pham and I regarding my solo show at the MacKenzie Art Gallery, To the Sooe.

““Erin’s work is very, very immersive. It’s really bringing the reaction, the chemistry, the biology within your body and really bringing it outwards and put(ting) it on display,” said Tak Pham, who curated this exhibition at the MacKenzie.”

Click here to read the full article.

 

 

Solo Exhibition MacKenzie Art Gallery

From January 24-April 19 2020, my first major solo exhibition in a Canadian museum, To the Sooe, will be on view at the MacKenzie Art Gallery in Regina, Canada.

To the Sooe is curated by Tak Pham, and features a collection of my embodied technological works to date, as well as a few brand new works made especially for this exhibition including video installation Machine Unlearning (2020) and interactive biodata sound sculpture Pinch and Soothe (2020).

The exhibition has already garnered major attention from the printed press in Regina, with front page feature stories in both the Leader Post and the Prairie Dog as well as a french language interview with Radio Canada.  As part of my exhibition activities I also gave an artist talk at the University of Regina as part of their Art for Lunch speaker series on January 24, 2020.

Elektra Festival Montreal

Project H.E.A.R.T. (Holographic Empathy Attack Robotics Team) (2017), my popstar/militainment VR game mashup with an affective control interface made in collaboration with Alex M Lee, is going to be featured at the upcoming Elektra festival XX in Montreal!  Look for it this June!

 

Exhibition opening: June 7, 6pm-9pm

Exhibition Dates: June 7-15, 2019

Perte de Signal 5445 Avenue de Gaspé local #107, Montréal, QC H2T 3B2, Canada

 

Click here to check out the full programming of Elektra Festival 2019

Printemps Numerique Montreal

Musee McCord/ McCord Museum – 690 Sherbrooke St W, Montreal, QC H3A 1E9, Canada

Wednesday May 29 – Sunday June 2

Curated by Erandy Vergara

Artists: Sofian Audry, Mara Eagle, Erin Gee, Julia Zamboni

 

to the sooe (2018), my revocalized machine learning sound artwork inspired by ASMR made in collaboration with Sofian Audry, is featured in exhibition at the McCord Museum as part of Printemps Numèrique in Montreal.

Click here to learn more about the exhibition including details on the works by the other artists in the show.

 

 

Review: Canadian Art

Amber Berson wrote a thoughtful review on the occasion of Eastern Bloc’s 10th anniversary exhibition Amplification that features discussion and images of my first internet-artwork https://laughingweb.space

This exhibition meant a lot to me as an artist that has been supported by Eastern Bloc over the years not only by the fact that they have exhibited me and involved me in many projects…but also I have been enriched an supported by their fantastic programming.  I salute Eastern Bloc and wish them all the best in their next 10 years!

To read the article, click here.

Review in Canadian Art

I really appreciate this article by Tatum Dooley for Canadian Art on the Worldbuilding exhibition curated by John G Hampton and Maiko Tanaka at Trinity Square Video. My work Project H.E.A.R.T. which highlights VR and emotions made with Alex M Lee is featured, among other great works by Jeremy Bailey Kristen D Schaffer Eshrat Erfanian and Yam Lau.  Following is an excerpt from the article:

“The gamification of our bodies renders the physical form void, replaced by screens where our bodies and emotions can be morphed and manipulated. Perhaps the only way to create art with technology as advanced and recent as VR is to reckon with its potential consequences.

Gee’s project, the most realized out of the four artists in the exhibition, masters this reckoning. I spoke with Gee in the lead-up to the exhibition, and she explained the conceptual backbone of the piece. “I’m working through questions of emotional sincerity when it comes to self-help. In theory, if you can technologically master your emotions, if you can just make yourself excited, then you can make yourself a better, happier person. I don’t know how sincere that is…”

Click on the link below for the full article.

VR and the Failure of Self-Help Technology

In general, I feel very proud of this work but also very exhausted by it.  Through the project I’ve been working through the relationship between pop music and war, self help and sincerity, and ultimately I’m working through these issues of technique and technology in how life and trauma comes to us.  During the panel for the exhibition, there was a question of whether I was “pro-war”, and it’s one that I have received a few times in facebook messages from curious friends from far away.  The project is complex and difficult to read because I think it has to be.  It reflects my own mediatized understanding of international conflict, maybe my own frustration at my lack of understanding.

The best I can understand war is how it is mediated to me: through video games and news cycles, through abstract discussions on the radio. The goal of this project was never to address the terror and complexity of geopolitical conflict, but rather, to propose a psychedelic pop culture mirror, imagining a video game ruled not by characters that espouse self-righteous violence and grit, but technologically manipulated empathy and enthusiasm.  This game fails to address war in the same way that all technologically mediated attempts to do so fail to address war.  I also am also dissatisfied at the idea of an artistic protest that makes a cartoonish, morally didactic utopia where rainbows and love shoot out of guns instead of flesh-tearing bullets. I think the answer about the politics of this game lie in the end screen: an abstract screen that confronts you with statistics of death and trauma as a result of the battle itself.  I don’t think there is a way to win the game.