pop music Tag

Review in Canadian Art

I really appreciate this article by Tatum Dooley for Canadian Art on the Worldbuilding exhibition curated by John G Hampton and Maiko Tanaka at Trinity Square Video. My work Project H.E.A.R.T. which highlights VR and emotions made with Alex M Lee is featured, among other great works by Jeremy Bailey Kristen D Schaffer Eshrat Erfanian and Yam Lau.  Following is an excerpt from the article:

“The gamification of our bodies renders the physical form void, replaced by screens where our bodies and emotions can be morphed and manipulated. Perhaps the only way to create art with technology as advanced and recent as VR is to reckon with its potential consequences.

Gee’s project, the most realized out of the four artists in the exhibition, masters this reckoning. I spoke with Gee in the lead-up to the exhibition, and she explained the conceptual backbone of the piece. “I’m working through questions of emotional sincerity when it comes to self-help. In theory, if you can technologically master your emotions, if you can just make yourself excited, then you can make yourself a better, happier person. I don’t know how sincere that is…”

Click on the link below for the full article.

VR and the Failure of Self-Help Technology

In general, I feel very proud of this work but also very exhausted by it.  The work is matched in technical complexity by its conceptual complexity, as I conflate pop music with war, self help with sincerity, and ultimately I’m working through these issues of performativity in play and life.  During the panel for the exhibition, there was a question of whether I was “pro-war”, and it’s one that I have received a few times in facebook messages from curious friends from far away, so it’s obviously something that needs a bit of addressing.  I personally am not pro-war.  However I also am also dissatisfied at the idea of an artistic protest that makes a cartoonish, didactic utopia where rainbows and love shoot out of guns instead of flesh-tearing bullets.  The project is complex and confused and vague because I think it has to be.  I  do not understand “real” war, for starters.   I have never served my country in any military: I’m a millennial woman born on the Canadian prairies raised in relative privilege that went to art school.  The best I can understand is how war is mediated to me: through video games and news cycles, through abstract discussions of other people on the radio. In this way I don’t think that the goal of this project was ever to address the terror and complexity of geopolitical conflict, but rather, to propose a psychedelic pop culture mirror, imagining a video game ruled not by characters that espouse self-righteous violence and grit, but technologically manipulated empathy and enthusiasm.  This game fails to address war in the same way that all technologically mediated attempts to do so likely fail to address war.  I guess a part of me is wondering if perhaps maybe it’s easier to question and hate this version however because it’s feminized.

Erin Gee - Vocaloid Gig At Nocturne (X + 1)

Gig Vocaloid

A performative, distributed video-text band from a dystopic future where the human voice is lost and pop music reigns supreme. Virtual voice is key component for the synthesized pop star. Dancing, costumed performers carry tablets that display the human larynx and song lyrics as they dance in sync.

GIG VOCALOID is a virtual pop band that had its first performance at the Musée d’art Contemporain de Montreal in February 2015 at X + 1: an evening of Internet-inspired art.

The project is inspired by virtual pop stars such as Hatsune Miku, which exist equally as distributed visual media avatar (holograms, merchandise), and as digital software tools for public, fan-based synthesized vocal creation. GIG VOCALOID is also inspired by boy and girl pop bands, whereupon individual voices and musicality are often superseded by a pop “character.” This is especially true in Japanese pop group AKB48, which has 48 female members whom are voted upon by the public for the right to solo singing and “leadership” within the group.

In this pop music context, celebrity character, fashion and visual appeal is more important than the human singing voice itself, which is often replaced by synthesizers and pitch correction. GIG VOCALOID invokes a fantasy posthumanist future where the human voice is lost, subjectivity is dead, and everyone is celebrating.

Externalizing the human voice outside of the preciousness of the human body, the human larynx (typically a hidden, interior aspect of vocal performance) is displayed prominently on tablets. “Lyrics” to their song flash aleatorically through these videos, which enable humans performers to be the support for digital artwork. GIG VOCALOID re-localizates the voice beyond the borders of the flesh body in an infectious avatar-dream.

GIG VOCALOID thrives through multiplicity, otherness, and inauthentic copies, so the band exists through 5 anonymous core members whose identities are not essential.

GIG VOCALOID consists of five masked characters: Cheerful (the leader, they like the colour red and to make a statement) // Timidity (shy and graceful) // Twinkle (cute, optimistic) // Lolo (wild and crazy, the rebel) // and Grace (sophisticated, stoic, strong). Each of these masks is without a fixed gender.